Snow and mist

I follow many blogs.  A favourite is posted by a bloke called Jason who translates Spanish poetry and paints.  One thing I have copied is his use of the long vertical format for his images.  He achieves intense colours and a rich light that I find I cannot emulate.

Last week in the Yorkshire Dales, I found a simple subject: the snow had built in the lee of the dry stone walls on the distant fell across the valley.  Mist cloaked the heights.  In the foreground, islands of richly coloured coarse grass stood out against the snow.

SAMSUNG DIGITAL CAMERA

After painting this, it dawned on me that the curling lines made by the walls were following the landscape.  This karst slope comprises  shelfs and drops made as hidden water eroded the rock from beneath.  I tried a quick sketch.

Buckden Out Moor looking west (24)

Jason paints “directly from nature with my arse in the mud and my hands getting cold“.  This too is how I like to paint.  Except I worked standing, drawing into paper dampened with snow, with water soluble graphite and an inktense black crayon.

7 responses to “Snow and mist

    • Just looked. What a stunning place. Still, it’ll be a few years before i can go there. I have little ones with unsophisticated tastes – package hols, pools, kids disco and lots of friends to make. Quiet, mountain scenery, walking … Sadly not!

  1. I know it’s a bit obnoxious to put a link on someone else’s blog. If you want to have a look at the page and delete it I won’t be offended. I just thought you might be interested.

  2. Pingback: 50: Andalusia, Milos, Yorkshire and More. | Almofate's Likes

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